Creative Prompt #221: Velvet

Post the direct URL (link) where your drawing, doodle, artwork is posted (e.g. your blog, Flickr) in the comments area of this post. I would really like to keep all the artwork together and provide a way for others to see your work and/or your blog.

We are also talking about this on Twitter. Use the hashtag #CPP

The Creative Prompt Project, also, has a Flickr group, which you can join to  post your responses. I created this spot so those of you without blogs and websites would have a place to post your responses.

Velvet TV movie, 1984

Velvet Underground

Velvet magazine

Velvet Light Trap – A journal of film and media studies, edited by graduate students at the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Velvet Taco

Definition: “Velvet is a type of woven tufted fabric in which the cut threads are evenly distributed, with a short dense pile, giving it a distinctive feel.

The word ‘velvety’ is used as an adjective to mean “smooth like velvet.” Velvet can be either synthetic or natural.

Traditionally, velvet is associated with nobility. Velvet was introduced to Baghdad during the rule of Harun al-Rashid by Kashmiri merchants and to Al-Andalus by Ziryab. In the Mamluk era, Cairo was the world’s largest producer of velvet. Much of it was exported to Venice, Al-Andalus and the Mali Empire. Musa I of Mali, the ruler of the Mali Empire, visited Cairo on his pilgrimage to Mecca. Many Arab velvet makers accompanied him back to Timbuktu. Later Ibn Battuta mentions how Suleyman (mansa) the ruler of Mali wore a locally produced complete crimson Velvet caftan on Eid. During the reign of Mehmed II, assistant cooks wore blue-coloured dresses (câme-i kebûd), conical hats (külâh) and baggy trousers (çaksir) made from Bursa velvet.[citation needed]

from Wikipedia

Velvet with Medici Arms, Florence or Venice, 1440–1500

King Richard II of England directed in his will that his body should be clothed in velveto in 1399.[1]

The earliest sources of European artistic velvets were Lucca, Genoa, Florence and Venice, which continued to send out rich velvet textures. Somewhat later the art was taken up by Flemish weavers, and in the sixteenth century, Bruges attained a reputation for velvets that were not inferior to those of the great Italian cities.”

Velvetpop.com

Red Velvet Cake

Velvet Elvis Painting

 

 

Author: Jaye

Quiltmaker who enjoys writing and frozen chocolate covered bananas.

2 thoughts on “Creative Prompt #221: Velvet”

  1. Hi! I have not read your blog in awhile, and just wanted to say thanks. I have some catching up to do, lots of great info and inspiration. Have to get my sketchbook out andwork on the prompts!

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