La Pass Center Medallions

Kelly Pena, a quiltmaker/sewist also working on La Pass and in the private La Pass FB group, creating a basic and an easy to understand tutorial for making center medallions.  She has kindly allowed me to use her photos for this English Paper Piecing technique. This question has come up a few times in our La Pass group. I consulted with Kelly and said that I would write a blog post using her photos so there would be a permanent link to the information. I have added a little bit of additional explanation to Kelly’s already excellent tutorial.

Tula Pink's Parisville Cameo
Tula Pink’s Parisville Cameo

Our La Pass rosettes require certain sized fabric pieces that correspond to the paper we are using to create various rosettes. We fussy cut the fabrics and make cool designs. Sometimes people want to use a larger motif, such as Tula Pink’s Marie Antoinette from Parisville Deja Vu. This motif would be difficult to put together using the various shapes and pieces. Not impossible, but very difficult.

In order to use up, in this case, the entire cameo and not make ourselves completely crazy, we need more ‘paper space’.

Combine papers
Combine papers

1. Find all of the paper pieces you need (want to use) to make the center medallion. Tape the paper pieces together for the final shape. This can vary depending on the shapes making up the rosette and you can adjust the shape by adding or deleting papers until you are satisfied. You can create quite a large shape.

As far as I know, there is no size limit as the paper will be removed at some point anyway. My gut tells me that you may have some issues with the bias if the pieces are too large. As a result, and, as usual, be careful with the bias.

You can configure the papers into any shape that will work for the fabric you have. I tried this technique on one of the Month 4 rosettes and found it moderately successful. In looking at Kelly’s example above, I should have added the long, thin diamonds to my center in my attempt. I think it would have made the process easier. The concave edges around the center diamonds are difficult and the long, thin diamonds make the edge easier to deal with.

Lay combined papers on fabric
Lay combined papers on fabric

2. Lay the combined and taped papers on the fabric. Adjust the placement until you have the fabric motif you want centered on your papers.

Remember to take seam allowance into account.

You can use a light board or light box** here for more accuracy.

 
 
Cut around paper leaving seam allowance
Cut around paper leaving seam allowance

3. Cut around the template allowing for seam allowance.

N.B.: In the image (left), Kelly is cutting freehand. If you are not confident, you can also use a small rotary cutting ruler**. If you use a ruler, you will need to keep moving it around the piece. In this case, a rotating cutting mat** might be helpful.

Cameo/Center Medallion basted
Cameo/Center Medallion basted

4. Baste as usual. Kelly and I are both using glue for La Pass. I am using thread basting for my Half Hexie Star project. Either method will work with this center medallion technique.

You may find it helpful for circular shapes to cut notches into the seam allowance when basting.

5. Stitch up your new larger piece. The paper shapes used will allow you to sew as if you were stitching all the shapes separately.
 
Thanks, again, to Kelly for allowing me to use her words and photos.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Obviously, you should shop at local quilt shops, knitting shops or art stores. However, I use Amazon affiliate links. I may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on that item’s link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I only link to items I like. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support the costs related to maintaining this blog.

Finishing Bullseye Blocks pt.2

The other day I showed you how to finish the bullseye blocks in preparation for the next circle. I didn’t have all of the photos, but I do now. Until I can write a real, complete tutorial you’ll have to look at both posts and integrate them. I know you can!

This tutorial assumes that you have cut your backgrounds and appliqued your circles to those backgrounds.

Supplies (same as previous post)

  • Bullseye blocks
  • Inspira duckbill applique' scissors
    Inspira duckbill applique’ scissors

    Applique’ scissors** – I have two pair. One is by Gingher, which I have had since the dawn of time. These are maybe 10 inches, but probably 8 inches. The other is a much smaller pair (6?) I bought last year at Cottage Quilting in Medford. The brand is Inspira and they are shown on the Husqvarna/Viking website. I thought they were super cute and I had never seen a pair this size before. N.B. after using them for this project, I really like the Inspira duckbills. The holes are really small, so if  you have large hands, they may be uncomfortable.

  • Cutting mat**

Optional Supplies:

Steps:

As mentioned above, previous steps can be found in the previous post.

…Your goal is to be able to cut a circle out of the background fabric without harming the front circle.

Bullseye: Cut parallel to the line of stitching
Bullseye: Cut parallel to the line of stitching

Second, cut a slit.  You will need to continue pinching the background layer of fabric away from the front circle. The slit should be cut straight down, parallel to the line of stitching. If it is angled, you will see it right away in the V shaped cut that results. It’s no big deal, but try to keep it straight so it is parallel to the sewing line and makes a neater cut.

 

Now, continue on to step three in the previous post.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Obviously, you should shop at local quilt shops. However, I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item’s link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

Finishing Bullseye Blocks

Since I am working on a Bullseye project, I thought it would be a good opportunity to write some tutorials about the process. At the moment, this will not be a full set of step by step tutorials. You’ll have to use the skills you have gained from my Quilt Class tutorials to extrapolate the rest of the process.

This tutorial assumes that you have cut your backgrounds and appliqued your circles to those backgrounds.

Supplies

  • Bullseye blocks
  • Inspira duckbill applique' scissors
    Inspira duckbill applique’ scissors

    Applique’ scissors** – I have two pair. One is by Gingher, which I have had since the dawn of time. These are maybe 10 inches, but probably 8 inches. The other is a much smaller pair (6″) I bought last year at Cottage Quilting in Medford. The brand is Inspira and they are shown on the Husqvarna/Viking website. I thought they were super cute and I had never seen a pair this size before.

  • Cutting mat**

Optional Supplies:

Steps

Bullseye block: facedown on cutting mat
Bullseye block: facedown on cutting mat

First, take one block and lay it face down on your cutting mat.

The picture shows the sewing line (arrow is pointing to it; you may need to enlarge the photo). Use the sewing line as a cutting guide. If you want, you can draw in an erasable line to follow for cutting. You don’t need to do that, though. Just eyeball one quarter to a half inch.

Bullseye: Pinch fabric layers away from each other
Bullseye: Pinch fabric layers away from each other

Pinch the background fabric layers away from the front/circle fabric layer. Your fingers should be about half an inch away from the seam line, as the photo shows.

This is usually a two handed process and you will need to feel around to make sure both layers are well away from each other.

Your goal is to be able to cut a circle out of the background fabric without harming the front circle.

Second, cut a slit.  (no photo) You will need to continue pinching the background layer of fabric away from the front circle. The slit should be cut straight down. If it is angled, you will see it right away. It’s no big deal, but try to keep it straight so it is parallel to the sewing line.

Third, let the fabric layers go back together, e.g. they are not pinched anymore, but, again, laying flat on the cutting mat.

Bullseye blocks: Enlarge the slit
Bullseye blocks: Enlarge the slit

Fourth, carefully stick the duckbill tip of your applique’ scissors into the slit and start cutting away the background layer. Cut one quarter to a half inch away from the seam line.

Be careful to only cut the background layer. The duckbill part of the  scissors should help keep you from cutting the foreground. This doesn’t mean you don’t have to be vigilant. You do!

If I sound like a militant dictator, it is because I have cut through the fronts of appliques and had to do them over.

Be vigilant.

Bullseye: cutting out the background
Bullseye: cutting out the background

Fifth, continue cutting carefully around the whole circle. I keep the circle out of the way of the scissors to try and preserve as much fabric as possible. I can cut some of the shapes I need for other projects from the leftovers.

This part of the process becomes easier once you have cut a large enough slit so the front circle fabric shows.

In the photo, left, you can see how the duckbill rests on the front/circle fabric.

Bullseye: background cut out
Bullseye: background cut out

When you have cut the whole circle out, you will have a back view to the front fabric.

 

Repeat for all blocks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**Obviously, you should shop at local quilt shops. However, I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item’s link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

Tutorial: Adding Zipper Heads

I have said before that adding zipper heads to zipper tape is pretty easy. I don’t do it that often, so I always have to look it up. The main tutorial I use is Sara Lawson’s tutorial. Sara provides a ton of detail and I would advise watching it at least once. I am writing a quick tutorial so you can see another version.

Supplies:

Supplies required
Supplies required
Place zipper head face down
Place zipper head face down

1. Place your zipper head face down in your towel holder

2. Flip your zipper tape wrong side up. N. B. This means that both zipper tape and zipper head are facing in the same direction, wrong side up

3. Pull your zipper tape apart 3-4 inches and configure in a V formation

Make a V with the zipper tape
Make a V with the zipper tape

4. Carefully place each end of the zipper tape into each side of the zipper head

5. Push the tape in evenly until you can pull from the bottom

Completed zipper head installation
Completed zipper head installation

Voila! You did it!

In the future you can find this tutorial on the tutorials page.

 

Resources:

    • Natalie from Sew Hungry Hippie has a video tutorial using a jig she sells

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*N.B. : If you use a fork, you might want to get one at a thrift store and just use it for zippers rather than using one you eat with.

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

Reminder: Gift Bags

Once again, I am posting a gift bag tutorial to encourage you to forego paper wrapping and wrap your gifts in reusable gift bags. As a reminder, if you do not celebrate Christmas or another gift giving winter holiday, you can still make gift bags for birthdays, graduations, weddings and for giving quilts to people. You can make them using the tutorial below. You can make them using your own tutorial. You can use the In Color Order drawstring bag pattern or you can buy reusable fabric gift bags.

Supplies:

  • Fabric – I use either a half yard, a yard or a fat quarter. If you use a yard you can make 4 smallish bags, two medium bags or one large bag. You can make bags with any size piece of fabric and you can use the directions to make a specially sized bag for a special gift. Also, check out FabMo, if you are local, and get some super special fabric that makes up gorgeous gift bags.
  • thread
  • ribbon or cord or  use your imagination (braided yarn?)
  • Sewing machine
  • basic sewing kit

For this tutorial, we will use a fat quarter of fabric

1. If your fat quarter does not have a selvedge, create a hem using two folds so there are no raw edges. If your fat quarter has a selvedge, use the selvedge for the top. It won’t unravel. If you are using the selvedge and not making a hem, skip to step 4.

2. (If you need a hem) Press hem in place.

3. Sew hem with a decorative stitch, if you have it, a zigzag or straight stitch work fine as well.

Optional: If you have stitch letters on your sewing machine, stitch your name and the year so you know when you made the bag.

4. Fold hemmed bag in half WRONG SIDES TOGETHER so that half of the hem is underneath itself towards the top and the fold is on the left. You will be making a French seam.

Sew first seam on gift bag
Sew first seam on gift bag

5. Fold a piece of ribbon about 1.5 feet long in half. You can adjust the size of ribbon you use depending on how much ribbon you need to tie.

6. Place the folded ribbon in the open side of the bag about 4 inches from the top edge/hem.

7. Pin ribbon in place.

8. Pin rest of the right side and bottom closed. NOTE: If you are folding your fabric in half, you will be sewing two sides rather than the side and bottom. Basically, sew the sides or bottom closed depending on where your open edges are.

Use an 1/8 inch seam allowance or as small as you can.

9. Starting from the top, sew down the right side, backstitching at the beginning and over the ribbon 2-3 times. Backstitch at all stress points to keep the bag from ripping apart.

10. Turn at the corner and continue across the bottom, backstitching at the end.

11. Turn the bag inside out, so the right sides are together and the ribbon is out of the way of the seam (It will be inside the bag, but I put mine as straight as possible towards the opposite side of the bag).

12. Press seams, taking care to push them as far out as possible so there is no extra fabric near the seams.

NOTE: If you ribbon is synthetic or delicate, keep it out of the way of the iron.

Use a 1/2 inch or 5/8 inch seam allowance.

Finish French Seam
Finish French Seam

13. You are now sewing on the wrong side. Starting at the top, sew down the side and across the bottom again to finish the seam.

The raw edges will now be hidden inside the seams.

14. Open bag to make sure the raw edge is hidden inside the seam.

15. Turn bag inside out and press.

Candy cane heart gift bag
Candy cane heart gift bag

Voila! Your bag is really to use!

Pink Flower gift bag
Pink Flower gift bag

Benefits:

  • reusable
  • good way to use fabric you might not use for quilts
    • Novelty fabrics
    • fabric you don’t love anymore
    • Use fabric you already own
    • orphan blocks
    • vintage sheets
  • opportunity to buy holiday fabric without committing to making a holiday (or birthday) quilt
  • quick way to wrap
  • no need to rush out to buy gift wrap
  • no tape or scissors needed
  • small children can help wrap, or wrap their own gifts
  • Fabric costs can be amortized over the years of the gift bag use
  • bags are made quickly
  • good opportunity to try out decorative stitches
  • Can quickly make a gift bag for an oddly shaped gift. I once wrapped a weed whacker in a gift bag!
  • Odd sized bags can be cut up later and used for different sized gifts
  • I reuse ribbon I get from other places for the ties
  • Easy to open and close the gift bag up again if the gift tag falls off
  •  
  • Embellishment possibilities are endless, if you want to take the time. Gift bags are a great way to try out different techniques, stitches, embroidery and embellishments
Blue Flower gift bag
Blue Flower gift bag

Drawbacks:

  • takes time to develop a stockpile
  • reusable gift bags have to be stored
  • fabric costs are not insignificant
  • You don’t get beautiful mounds of boxed gifts under your tree

Any gift bags you make will add to your stockpile. You can use leaders and enders to make them, which means that your regular sewing isn’t interrupted much .

Resources:

Tutorial: Mitered Borders

Supplies:

Why Miter?

  • You can sew 2 or more borders together first then put them on your quilt top and miter them
  • Blends prints well
  • Lines up linear designs such as stripes
  • Add some pizzazz to a block that needs something extra, especially if you have to add coping strips

How to Miter:

Cut borders
Cut borders
  1. Cut top and bottom border strips to the quilt top side lengths, plus an additional 2x the border width plus 1″. The 2x the border width gives you enough space to make the 45 degree angle. The extra 1″ is added for insurance. You can always add more “insurance”.
    1. Formula: quilt top side lengths plus (2x the border width) plus 1“
    2. Example: When the top of the quilt is 45”l and you want the side borders to be 5”w: 45 + (2×5”=10)=55”+ 1” =56
  2. Sew the top border to the quilt top, starting and stopping ¼” away from the ends of the quilt, backstitching at each end.
  3. Repeat for the other 3 borders. The corners will be flapping around.
  4. Fold the quilt top in half diagonally, right sides together, creating a triangle.
  5. Line up two adjacent borders; for example, the top border and the right-side border.
  6. Fold quilt in half diagonally
    Fold quilt in half diagonally

    Place the ruler along the 45-degree line.

  7. Draw a line
    Draw a line

    When lined up, draw a line using a pencil and a ruler along that 45 degree angle and extend it over the borders.

  8. Pin firmly in place.
  9. Locate the stitch line you made when you sewed the border to the quilt top and begin sewing there.
  10. Sew from the stitch line out toward the end of the border, directly on the pencil line.
  11. Backstitch at the beginning and end
  12. Sew and open to reduce bulk
    Sew and open to reduce bulk

    Open up the quilt top to check the miter. The corner where the three seams meet should lie flat when viewed from the front. There should be no tucks or gaps. The borders should also be square.

  13. When the corner is perfect (or at a point that you’re happy with it!), refold the top to reveal that 45 degree stitching
  14. Trim the seam (the extra border length) to 1/4″.
  15. Press open to decrease the bulk of fabric at the seam corner.
  16. Repeat these steps with the other three corners

 

Resources:

How and Why to Miter – Quilting Hub tutorial

UCAB Small Front Pocket Tutorial pt.2

I know these tutorials are taking forever, but they also take a long time to write. Doing them in smaller chunks fits my schedule better. Hopefully, the smaller chunks makes the bag more doable as well.

Finished Small Interior Front Pocket
Finished Small Interior Front Pocket

Today we are going to make the Clippy Pockets (type 1) used on the sides of the small, interior pocket instead of using the badge holders. The other day, we made the center zipper section. These Clippy Pockets will be placed on either side of the center zipper section. The pleats hold your WonderClips. The Clippy Pocket is not part of Quiltessa Natalie’s original pattern.

You can find the original pincushion instructions, from which this tutorial evolved, in Love of Patchwork & Quilting, issue 39. It is available digitally in the Apple and Google Play stores. The same pincushion pattern is available in the book 50 Little Gifts** from Lucky Spool.

Additional Supplies:

Notes:

  • Use a quarter inch seam allowance
  • Pay attention to the flaps and pin them back if necessary so you don’t sew them down

Tutorial:

Side front interior pocket with clip holder
Side front interior pocket with clip holder

The front pockets needs two of these side pockets. They will go on each side of the center zipper/mesh pocket.

You can make four and put more Clippy Pockets on the back, if you want. We won’t do this in this tutorial, but it is an option.

You will need P4 and all the pieces for the Clippy Pocket, v.2.

The Clippy Pocket section is inserted on the bottom of pattern pg.13. I made the Clippy Pocket instead of vinyl badge holders.

UCAB: Pieces You need
UCAB: Pieces You need

Yes, I am using different fabrics. I am sure you can manage.

Directions:

1. Cut the following:

A – cut 1 -1 1/4”x5” for edge
B- cut 5 – 2”x4” for Clippy tabs/flaps
C – cut 5 – 1”x5” for between the flaps
D – cut 1 – 3 ¾”x5 for back
Shapeflex – cut 1 piece 19 ¾” x 3 ½”

  1. Sew flaps: fold B pieces RST and sew short sides. One long side will remain open
  2. Turn sewn B pieces right sides out
  3. Press B pieces. Fold will have a crisp seam. B pieces are now flaps
  4. Lay A piece right side up
  5.  
Layer and center a sewn B piece (flap) on top of the A piece
Layer and center a sewn B piece (flap) on top of the A piece

Layer and center a sewn B piece (flap) on top of the A piece

 

  1. Layer and center a sewn B piece (flap) on top of the A piece
    Layer and center a sewn B piece (flap) on top of the A piece

Layer a C piece on top of the A and B pieces WS up

  1.  

Sew 3 pieces together along the long side where the raw edge of the flap will be sewn shut

 

  1. Press Piece
    Press Piece

    Press C piece away from the other two pieces

  2.  
Layer another flap (B piece) on top of your sewn pieces
Layer another flap (B piece) on top of your sewn pieces

Layer another flap (B piece) on top of your sewn pieces

 

  1. Follow steps until you are out of flaps (B pieces) and C pieces

 

Finished top
20200113_162045-sm

You will end up with a piece comprised of strips and flaps that is approximately 3 ¾” x 5”. This piece looks like a ‘flap ladder’. The sides of this ‘flap ladder’ should reach the sides of your P4 strip

Press ShapeFlex to P4
Press ShapeFlex to P4

Press Shapflex on to your P4 piece

Layer your ‘flap ladder’ RST with piece D and sew along the short sides

  • Carefully press seams open without creasing piece D or the ‘Flap ladder’
Now you have a loop
Now you have a loop

Now you have a loop.

Turn your loop right sides out

Press flat

Place 2" from the bottom of P4
Place 2″ from the bottom of P4

Place your sewn piece 2” from the bottom of your P4 strip.

  • Pin in place with the raw edges at the side
  • Fit your machine with your matching or top stitching thread
  • Pin and sew across the bottom using matching or top stitching thread

Sew across the bottom. N.B. : I used a contrasting thread so you could see it. For my final bag, I will use a matching thread.

Finished Clippy Pocket ready to add to small front pocket
Finished Clippy Pocket ready to add to small front pocket
  1. Continue with the directions on the Ultimate Carry All Bag pattern, pg.14, starting with “then fold the pocket fabric in half…”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next time we will work on the Exterior front pocket

Previous Tutorials:

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

STB Hidden Zipper Tab Tutorial

The Sew Together Bag pattern tells you to put the binding on the bag, then sew the zipper tabs over it. With a little effort, you can hide the ends of the zipper tabs under the binding, which is what I did with my recent Sew Together Bags. My hack takes place after you sew the binding on to the sides.

Extra Supplies

First, I sew the side bindings on to the exterior. The pattern says to sew it to the interior, but trust me. This will work.

Mark where to stop sewing
Mark where to stop sewing

Second,  I mark where to stop sewing. The goal is to leave that section of the binding under the middle fold open so I can insert the zipper tab. My regular practice is to use 2 pins. That is a sign to me that I need to stop sewing. use whatever method works for you. A Chakoner** or a Sewline Air Erase** pen can also work.

Wrap biding around
Wrap biding around

Next, I wrap the binding around to the top. In this case, I have to switch to WonderClips to mark where to stop sewing. because that whole area is WAY TOO thick. Ask me how I know. Note: my clips are in the same place as the two pins and I deliberately used pink only to mark the stopping point. The clips on the rest of that edge were different colors. Do whatever you need to do to mark your stopping point.

Sew, leaving a space open
Sew, leaving a space open

Finally, I sew. I stop halfway between the folds of the bag’s side on each side of the center fold.

After following the directions in the pattern to sew the binding to the long, top zipper, I sew the zipper tabs to the ends of the zipper.

It occurred to me while I was doing this that next time I would cut the zipper tabs the same size as the binding. It would make wrapping the zipper tabs around the zipper ends a little easier.

Sew in Zipper Tab
Sew in Zipper Tab

Once the zipper tabs are sewn to the end of the zipper, I insert the end of the zipper tab into the space in the binding. Then I connect the stitching lines from where I stopped sewing to where I started sewing.

Zipper tabs sewn under binding
Zipper tabs sewn under binding

After that I sink the threads and the side bindings are done. I suppose you can backstitch, but I don’t like the look. It takes more time to tie knots, but I think it looks more finished.

 

Here is the first Sew Together Bag I made according to the directions (left). See how the zipper tab is just sewn to the top of the binding after the fact? One from the most recent batch is on the right. See how much better the end of the zipper looks tucked in? Is it a pain to sew it this way? Yes, it is an extra step, but it looks so much better.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

UCAB Small Front Pocket Tutorial pt.1

Recently, I posted the tutorial for the second Large Pocket. That is one of the pockets needed to complete the Ultimate Carry All Bag by Natalie Patton. Next we are going to work on the first part of the small, interior front pocket

In order to sew along, you will need to:

You can find more information at the following links:

Additional Supplies**

Finished Small Interior Front Pocket
Finished Small Interior Front Pocket

The directions for the small interior, front pocket start the bottom of pg. 12 in the pattern.

N. B.: My version of this Small Front Pocket eliminates the vinyl/badge holder pockets and includes a second type of Clippy pocket that I developed from a pincushion pattern.

N.B.2: put a Post-it note on pg.9 to remind you where her zipper instructions can be found. She refers back to them in a non-specific way and marking them is helpful for quick access.

N.B.3: I am using a couple of different versions of the front pocket for this tutorial. Ignore the differences in fabric and pay attention to the location of the parts as well as the piece numbers.

Tutorial:

UCAB - Front, small pocket
UCAB – Front, small pocket

This pocket is made in 3 parts.

Center Zipper Pocket

UCAB -layer fabrics to insert zipper
UCAB -layer fabrics to insert zipper

First, we will make the center zipper pocket. If you haven’t already done so, fuse SF101 (or similar) to the pieces that make up the zipper pocket.

We need to add a zipper to the center part of the pocket. Full directions for adding a zipper start on pg.9. We also talked about this in the Large Pocket Tutorial.

First, lay L5 down face up/right side up.

Lay zipper on top of L5 with zipper pull facing up.

On top of L5 and the zipper, lay P5 on top of zipper face down/right side down. The layers should be  L5 and P3 RST with the zipper in between.

Pinning Zipper ends
Pinning Zipper ends

As I said before, Natalie Patton does something really clever with her zipper. She folds the zipper tape at a 45 degree angle and pins it. This makes it look really neat and tidy. Do this, as shown in detail in the Large Pocket Tutorial. Sew the layers including the zipper, being careful to move the zipper pull out of the way as needed. The last photo above shows how to sew (green line) and reminder to stop half way (red line) in order to readjust the zipper pull.

Turn over and press. Top stitch next to the zipper.

Wait to sew second side of zipper until later.

The center pocket has mesh, so cut the mesh and the double-fold elastic. The pattern doesn’t say, but you need to cover both long edges of the mesh with double-fold elastic or twill tape. I prefer the double-fold elastic.

Add mesh pocket to center zip pocket
Add mesh pocket to center zip pocket

In order to attach the mesh pocket to the center zipper pocket, first mesh 2″ down from the zipper.

Move L5 out of the way (right photo above).

Clip the mesh pocket to P3/partly sewn zipper section.

Sew around the mesh pocket
Sew around the mesh pocket

Leaving the top open (opening/top is closest to the zipper), sew around 3 sides of the mesh pocket. If you want to divide the pocket, mark as many divisions as you want with painter’s tape and sew very close to the painter’s tape without sewing through it.

After you finish sewing the mesh pocket, finish the center section by layering the other sides of P3 and L5 with the zipper the way you did before and sew. You will be sewing more of a roll this time.

Almost finished center zipper pocket
Almost finished center zipper pocket

Your finished center pocket will look like the above photo. You still need to make the pleat so you can add 3D items to the pocket.

use ruler to measure for pleat
use ruler to measure for pleat

Stick your ruler 1/2in into the bottom of the mesh/zipper pocket to create the right sized pleat.

Clip and sew
Clip and sew

Use Wonder Clips on the sides and the bottom to keep everything in place, especially on the top double-fold elastic. I didn’t take a photo, but you do want to put clips on the top double-fold elastic, because it tends to curl in from the mesh pocket wanting to curl.

Sew up the sides. These seams will be sewn again later, so you just need to sew enough to hold them in place until final assembly.

Finished interior center zipper pocket
Finished interior center zipper pocket

Your center section is finished.

Next time we will work on the side Clippy pockets.

Previous Tutorials:

 

 

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

UCAB Large Pocket #2 Tutorial – pt.2

Recently, I posted the first part of the tutorial for the Large Pocket #2. That tutorial included a pocket that would help you organize your WonderClips.

In order to sew along, you will need:

You can find more information at the following links:

Additional Supplies**

UCAB: Large Pocket #2
UCAB: Large Pocket #2

Today we will finish putting together the second large pocket. As I said in the previous tutorial, the Clippy pocket is not part of the original pattern, but using that tutorial, you can easily add it to P1 and still have enough space for other tools.

The pattern calls for a mesh pocket on the back of P1. You can add slip pockets instead, if you want. Follow the general directions in the tutorial for the first large pocket. To add the mesh pocket, follow these directions:

Seal the edges of the mesh
Seal the edges of the mesh

Seal the edges of the mesh with doublefold elastic like you did on Large Pocket #1.

UCAB Bind Mesh Pocket
UCAB Bind Mesh Pocket

The first step is to bind the top of the mesh pocket. Take the fold over elastic and fold it in half. Use WonderClips to hold the elastic in place.

Using matching thread, sew along the edge of the binding closest to the mesh. I used a straight stitch.

Add Mesh pocket
Add Mesh pocket

Mark 3” down from the other side of the right side of P1.

Tip: Make sure, before sewing that both pockets (Clippy & Mesh) have their openings in the same direction up. When the two raw edges are held WST, both pockets should have their openings up, closest to where the zipper will be sewed.

Line up top of mesh with 3” line.

Sew bottom of mesh pocket to P1.

Mark with blue tape
Mark with blue tape

Mark your pocket divisions with blue tape – make however many you want. I have two, separated by one line of stitching

Sew NEXT to blue tape.

Add Zipper

You can also look at the zipper instructions from the first large pocket tutorial.

Lay L1 down face up/right side up.

Lay zipper on top of L1 with zipper pull facing up.

Line up P1 with Clippy Pocket on top of zipper right side down.

Natalie Patton does something really clever with her zipper. She folds the ends of the zipper tape at a 45 degree angle and pins it. This makes it look really neat and tidy once the zipper is sewn in.

Zipper's 45 degree angle
Zipper’s 45 degree angle

In the pattern (pg.10), she talks a lot about pinning, horizontal pins, etc. I found it to be kind of confusing.

The photo (left) shows how I interpret her instructions. I tried it and it worked for me. Sotak Handmade has a video where she adds the zipper using a similar method.

Once you have the zipper tape folded and pinned, continuing layering the last piece of fabric on top.

Three layers waiting to sew in zipper
Three layers waiting to sew in zipper

The edges of the folded zipper tabs stick out a little bit from the side of the piece where you will be sewing. This is ok and how it is supposed to look.

Sew along clipped edge to secure zipper. I use my quarter inch foot, but you can use your zipper foot, if it works for you. Make sure you move the zipper out of the way as you sew so it doesn’t interfere with your seam.

Layer second side of zipper
Layer second side of zipper

Open up three layers.

Top stitch near zipper. Follow the same directions for the second side of the zipper.

Measure pleat on the bottom
Measure pleat on the bottom

Pleat the bottom.

I use the ½” marking on a ruler to mark the ½”. Push it into the bottom.

Clip to keep it in place and sew along the edges using the seam allowance noted in the pattern.

UCAB: Large Pocket #2
UCAB: Large Pocket #2

Your pocket will look something like this.

Previous Tutorials:/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

UCAB Large Pocket #2 Tutorial – Clippy Pocket

A few days ago, I posted the second part of the tutorial for the first Large Pocket needed to complete the Ultimate Carry All Bag by Natalie Patton. This is the tutorial for the second Large pocket.

In order to sew along, you will need:

You can find more information at the following links:

Additional Supplies**

UCAB: Large Pocket #2
UCAB: Large Pocket #2

Today we will start the second of the large pockets. The directions for this step in the pattern start on page 8, step 2 of your pattern.

My version of this Large Pocket #2 includes a type of Clippy pocket that I added. The elastic holds your WonderClips and the pocket holds a rotary cutter.

Fabric and supplies layout
Fabric and supplies layout

This Clippy Pocket is not part of the pattern, but I will share how to make it.

The picture shows all the pieces with which we will be working. If you want to omit my Clippy pocket, skip those parts of this tutorial. If you want to include it, make this Clippy Pocket before starting on the bulk of Large Pocket #2, but after you have cut all the pieces. Having the small bits and bobs ready makes the assembly of Large Pocket #2 easier.

    1. Cut the pocket fabric 4.5 x 12.5”
    2. Cut the SF101 interfacing 4×12
    3. Apply SF101 to wrong side of fabric
    4. Cut double fold elastic (you can also use a strip of fabric) 4.5” long. You can add two strips if you want more space for WonderClips
    5. Clippy Pocket Fabric folded, finger pressed
      Clippy Pocket Fabric folded, finger pressed

      Fold pocket fabric in half and finger press. You want the short edges to touch when you fold and finger press. The folded piece will be 4.5”x6.25 (approx.)

    6. Pin RST with Elastic
      Pin RST with Elastic

      Unfold and pin elastic to piece 1/3 down from the fold or 1 ¾” down from finger pressed center

    7. Sew around edge
      Sew around edge

      Sew around edge, leaving an opening the bottom to turn and avoiding the top with the fold.

    8. Press Clippy Pocket
      Press Clippy Pocket

      Press.

    9. Clip corners          Tip: try to press the opening seam allowances as straight as possible
    10. Turn RS out
      Turn RS out

      Turn RS out, push out seams, especially corners. Make sure seams are crisp, the press again.

    11. Place Clippy Pocket in place on P1 by:
      1. Measure 9” down from top
      2. Measure ½” over
      3. Place Clippy Pocket
      4. Pin in place
    12. Cut an additional piece of double fold elastic 9 1/8 – 9 ¼”
    13. Measure down 3” from the top of P1. Place elastic in this location.
    14. Tuck one end of the elastic under the Clippy pocket to hide the raw edge
    15. Pin in place
    16. Mark the elastic so that your tools will fit. At some point prior to this, I looked at all the tools I thought I would use and measured them to make sure they would fit.
    17. Attach Clippy Pocket and divide elastic
      Attach Clippy Pocket and divide elastic

      Sew around 3 sides of the Clippy Pocket (not the top), ensuring that you catch the elastic in your seam.

    18. Sew on your marks in the elastic
    19. Add D-ring using a scrap of double-fold elastic or some fabric. Sew it in the seam allowance. I backstitch or go over the stitching a few times. This helps prevent the D-ring from becoming unsewn.
    20. Leave long tails at the start and end of your seams, pull threads to the back and tie off with knots

If you are not adding the Clippy Pocket, cut your elastic 20″, mark and sew, following the directions on the pattern.

Check back in a few days for the rest of the tutorial for putting the large pocket #2 together.

UCAB Large Pocket Tutorial #1 pt.2

A few days ago, I posted the first part of the tutorial for the first Large Pocket needed to complete the Ultimate Carry All Bag by Natalie Patton.

In order to sew along, you will need:

You can find more information at the following links:

Additional Supplies**

Finished Ultimate Carry All Large Pocket #1
Finished Ultimate Carry All Large Pocket #1

Today we will finish the first of the large pockets.The directions for this step int he pattern start on page 8.

In the first part of this tutorial, we made the P2 pocket. We will continue from where we left off.

Tutorial:

Sew P2 to P1

Take your P1 fabric piece and your P2 pocket.

Lay P1 Face Up and Mark
Lay P1 Face Up and Mark

Measure line 9” down from the top of P1.

Draw a light line with a Sewline** pencil. You can leave the ruler in place and adjust the placement of the pocket using the ruler, if you don’t want to mark your fabric.

Place P2 upside down on top P1. Line up the bottom of P2 with the 9″ line.

Pin the pocket in place.

Remove the ruler, if you haven’t already.

Sew across bottom of pocket
Sew across bottom of pocket

Using a 1/4″ seam allowance, stitch (see red line) across the bottom of the pocket ONLY. You may want to backstitch carefully or tie knots and sink your threads to secure.

N.B. In this picture (right), the pocket is unfinished. On your pocket, you will not need or being using the small clips show on the bottom of the pocket, which is in the middle of P1 in the picture.

Sew to secure P2
Sew to secure P2

Flip the pocket up so you can see the mesh pocket. Clip or pin in place.

Sew down the center of P2 (red line), going over the mesh pocket to secure everything and make the final division in the center of the mesh pocket.

Sew down the sides of the pocket (blue lines). Leave long thread tails at the beginning and end of these securing seams. Pull the threads to the back of the piece and tie the threads off with knots. You can use a backstitch, but tying off the threads will look better in your finished bag.

Add Zipper to Pocket

Layer fabric with zipper
Layer fabric with zipper

Lay L1 down face up/right side up.

Lay zipper on top of L1 with zipper pull facing up.

Line up P1 on top of zipper face down/right side down.

Natalie Patton does something really clever with her zipper. She folds the zipper tape at a 45 degree angle and pins it. This makes it look really neat and tidy.

Zipper's 45 degree angle
Zipper’s 45 degree angle

In the pattern (pg.10), she talks a lot about pinning, horizontal pins, etc. I found it to be kind of confusing.

The photo (left) shows how I interpret her instructions. I tried it and it worked for me.

Once you have the zipper tape folded and pinned, continuing layering the last piece of fabric on top.

Three layers waiting to sew in zipper
Three layers waiting to sew in zipper

The edges of the folded zipper tabs stick out a little bit from the side of the piece where you will be sewing. This is ok and how it is supposed to look.

Sew along clipped edge to secure zipper. I use my quarter inch foot, but you can use your zipper foot, if it works for you. Make sure you move the zipper out of the way as you sew so it doesn’t interfere with your seam.

Open up three layers

Top stitch near zipper.

Episode 4  of Natalie’s video is actually pretty good. I like the way she shows installing the zipper.

"Butterfly effect"
“Butterfly effect”
Layer second side of zipper
Layer second side of zipper

The confusing part is putting the pieces you have already sewn together with the other side of the zipper. The photo above shows kind of how this looks. This is the step where Natalie talks about opening up the first sewn side like a butterfly (pattern pg.10).

L1 face up/right side up.

Zipper on top of L1 face up/right side up.

P1 on top of zipper face down.

Sew along clipped edge to secure zipper. I use my quarter inch foot, but you can use your zipper foot, if it works for you. Make sure you move the zipper -See red line in the middle of the second side? – out of the way as you sew so it doesn’t interfere with your seam.

Top stitch near zipper.

Make Pleated Bottom

The pleated bottom allows you to more easily store items that are 3 dimensional

Measure pleat on the bottom
Measure pleat on the bottom

Use 1/2″ marking on my Creative Grids ruler, stick the side with 1/2″ marking into the pleat to measure it.

Clip the sides (the ruler should not interfere) to hold it in place.

Remove the ruler.

This is where I add D-rings. In this case, I used leftover bits of doublefold elastic to stand in for a loop.

Sew up the sides. Make sure to catch the loop/D-ring.

Finished Ultimate Carry All Large Pocket #1
Finished Ultimate Carry All Large Pocket #1

Your pocket is now finished.

 

 

 

 

Resources:

  • UCAB episode 1 : preparing for sewing pockets
  • UCAB episode 2 : sewing pockets, discusses thickness of pockets
  • UCAB episode 3 :badge holder pocket technique
  • UCAB episode 4 : Large pocket, installing zipper
  • UCAB episode 5 : installing a swivel hook, front and back of bag, front and back pockets
  • UCAB episode 6 : insert pockets into side panels
  • UCAB episode 7 : very brief video showing how the piece looks after installing the pockets in the side panels
  • UCAB episode 8 :Brief video showing the finished bag. No sewing

 

 

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

UCAB Large Pocket Tutorial pt.1

Last year at the guild Lynette and I started leading a sew-along with the Ultimate Carryall Bag pattern from Natalie Patton. The pandemic kind of blew the idea out of the water in the sense that we had thought about it. I decided that we needed to get back on track, because people had bought the pattern and cut out the pieces. On Sew Day earlier this month, I went into a Zoom breakout room and gave people a tutorial on making one of the large pockets.

In order to sew along, you will need:

You can find more information at the following links:

Ultimate Carry All large Pocket #1
Ultimate Carry All large Pocket #1

Today we are starting to make one of the large pockets. We will work on the front pocket.

Tutorial:

First, mark all of your pieces using the tags that Lynette made.

Next, go through your pattern and mark all references to cut pieces with the numbers Lynette created. If you don’t do this, you will have no idea which pieces I am talking about.

N.B. I am using two different pockets, which use different fabrics, to illustrate this tutorial.

Supplies for this step:

  • Basic Sewing Kit
  • Foldover elastic / double fold elastic
  • Mesh
  • Sewing machine
  • Thread to match mesh binding
  • WonderClips
  • 12″ Zipper

Note: I am just calling out a few supplies. You will need to check the pattern for a full list of supplies

UCAB Large Pocket 1 Outline
UCAB Large Pocket 1 Outline

With everything assembled, you should be ready to sew.

N.B.: instead of twill tape, I use ByAnnie’s double fold elastic (AKA fold over elastic). I like the way it matches the mesh and I like the way it folds over exactly in half so I can machine stitch it. If you are using Twill Tape, you will have to bind the mesh in best way you know.

UCAB Bind Mesh Pocket
UCAB Bind Mesh Pocket

Mesh Pocket

The first step is to bind the top of the mesh pocket. Take the fold over elastic and fold it in half. Use WonderClips to hold the elastic in place.

Using matching thread, sew along the edge of the binding closest to the mesh. I used a straight stitch.

Mark Mesh Pocket in halves and quarters
Mark Mesh Pocket in halves and quarters

Once that is done, mark the pocket in half and in quarters. I used pins.

N.B.: In the picture on the left, I have marked the mesh pocket in halves and quarters with pins, but I have not yet bound the mesh with the fold over elastic. Ignore the clips in this photo.

Add Mesh Pocket to P2

Clip bound mesh pocket to P2
Clip bound mesh pocket to P2

Clip the bound mesh pocket to the bottom of P2.

You will need to ease the excess mesh fabric into pleats at the bottom of P2.

I used as many WonderClips as I needed to keep the mesh in place. It is a little bit challenging to keep in place. It isn’t exactly slippery, but it doesn’t stick to the quilting cotton like another quilting cotton would. Sew the bottom of the mesh pocket to P2, sewing the pleats you clipped in place as you remove the clips.

Mesh Pleats
Mesh Pleats

After you sew the bottom of the mesh pocket to P2, you will notice that the mesh will look like the picture on the left on the bottom where you have pleated the mesh. This was a little bit of a challenging concept for me to understand. I don’t make many garments, as you know, which may be the reason. Also I had to figure out why to pleat. The pleats give the pocket dimension so you can use it for things that are not flat. You could also make this pocket with vinyl instead of mesh, if you want. I don’t really talk about that in this tutorial, but make the pocket the same width as P2 as bind it with quilting cotton rather than fold over elastic.

Fold top of P2 down RST
Fold top of P2 down RST

Fold P2 down towards the bottom RST. The top of P2 will cover the mesh pocket.

Clip or pin the sides in place to secure. Watch out for the other Wonder clips that you used for the mesh pocket. It would probably be bad if you sewed over them.

Sew Down Sides of P2
Sew Down Sides of P2

Sew down sides of P2 only. The orange lines in the image on the right indicate where to sew.

Backstitch at the top and bottom to secure.

Before turning, I pressed the seams on the sides open, being careful about the mesh. I was also careful not to press the top fold yet.

Turn P2 right sides out.

Press again, watching out for the mesh. ByAnnies mesh doesn’t seem to melt when pressed, but I was still careful.

Also, now press the top fold.

I pressed the bottom seam allowance inside the P2 pocket and sewed it closed when I sewed P2 to P1, which I will talk about in the next tutorial.

UCAB P2 pocket sewed to P1
UCAB P2 pocket sewed to P1

P2 is now finished. In the photo, I have already sewn it to P1, but I will talk about that next time.

Use the seam allowance indicated in the pattern. Tip: Natalie, the designer, sometimes switches seam allowance sizes so pay attention to those directions.

I made two of the P2 pockets and put them on both sides of this large pocket, using the same directions. In the next tutorial, we will sew the P2 pocket to P1 and add the zipper.

Simple Folded Corners Ruler

I bought Doug Leko’s Folded Corners Ruler** awhile ago but didn’t have a reason to use it until Saturday. I started working on the X Quilt last week. I was really struggling with the way the pattern was written. After reading a Bonnie Hunter post about Valentine’s Day where she mentioned this ruler**, I dug it out. I watched a video, started using it which resulted in the X quilt process moving along. I also felt happier.

Folded corners are often referred to as “flippy corners”. This ruler makes them easy. I was amazed to find that they sew up perfectly. I watched the Fat Quarter Shop video demo to get me started.

Two squares to join
Two squares to join

First you need the two squares indicated in your pattern. I used a 6.5 inch square and a 3.5 inch square. These sizes came straight from the pattern. These sizes were one of three pairs of sizes I needed to make the quilt. I used the same process on all the sizes and it worked perfectly regardless of size.

My smallest sizes were 3.5 inch square and 1.5 inch square (for the corner). I was concerned that the 1.5 incher would be too small, but it worked just as well as the others. N.B. I did have to make sure that the small pieces did not get caught in my machine, but it was made easier because there were no dog ears. Doug Leko does have a mini version of the ruler** I mentioned, but I don’t have it and didn’t’ investigate the differences. I also noticed that Creative Grids has a ruler that purports to do the same thing**.

Line up two squares
Line up two squares

Make sure right sides are together. Line up your squares so the corners are straight. You do not want to see the bottom square on the top or right when the pieces are lined up.

The above step requires fairly accurate cutting. By that I mean your square should be square.

Line up ruler
Line up ruler

Place the ruler** on the two squares. Line up the solid line on the left and the XX line on the bottom with your top square.

Lines to use
Lines to use

When you line up the ruler, there is a solid line on the left. It is the first solid line on the left and connects with the diagonal line. This is the line you place on the left side of the smaller square. The diagonal line should be corner to corner.

 

Cut on the diagonal
Cut on the diagonal

Cut on the diagonal. The ruler includes the diagonal seam allowance. This is a great feature of the ruler so you don’t have to guess where to sew like you do when drawing a diagonal line. Also! No drawing of diagonal lines. I have a lot of corners to add for the X quilt so this is a bonus. It saves me a little time.

 

 

Pin then sew
Pin then sew

I like to pin, then I sewed along the diagonal.

Press.

 

 

 

 

Perfect corner!
Perfect corner!

Perfect! You might think that I picked the most perfect one, but I didn’t. First, I didn’t know what was going to happen when I started taking photos for the tutorial. With very few exceptions all the corners came out lined up perfectly. Where they didn’t (1 or 2 only), I think it was because I didn’t press the fabric properly or didn’t cut accurately.

 

Whole Lozenge Block
Whole Lozenge Block

The whole block came out really well, too.

I love the idea of specialty rulers. I often buy them with hope and don’t take the time to learn to use them. Or they turn out to be not as promised- not as helpful, hard to use, etc. This ruler works really well. I am super pleased not to have to draw 2 zillion diagonal lines!

 

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item
when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost
to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your
clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.

Quilt Class: Setting the Blocks Together

I am using a different quilt for this tutorial, but I have faith that that won’t make a difference to all of you intelligent readers and students who have been following along with my various sampler class tutorials.

Supply List:

  • blocks
  • fabric for sashing
  • fabric cornerstones (I used scraps, but my cornerstones were only 1.5 inches square)
  • calculator
  • sewing machine
  • thread
  • measuring tools
  • basic rotary cutting kit
  • scissors or snips
  • seam ripper (I use a Clover ergonomic seam ripper)
  • pins
  • iron
  • ironing board
  • Mary Ellen’s Best Press (optional)
  • stiletto (optional)
  • design wall (optional, but super helpful)

Please note that we are only talking about sashing in this tutorial. We are not talking about borders. I will do a separate tutorial for borders in the future.

Red Strip Donation Blocks
Red Strip Donation Blocks

I started out with the above group of donation blocks. I have been setting these with plain blocks of the same size. I decided that I wanted to do something different with these blocks. Sashing is the answer. Having something between these blocks prevents the seams from getting too thick and hard to sew. Also, it allows each block to shine a little bit rather than being part of a mass. Adding sashing or plain borders or nothing is a design choice. For any quilt, it is important to decide on the look and feel you want.

Even if you put the same sized plain blocks between these blocks, the method I will show you works the same way.

Blocks with Sashing & Cornerstones
Blocks with Sashing & Cornerstones

The first step is to cut sashing and cornerstones. The photo above shows all the sashing and cornerstones cut and laid out on my design wall.

If you don’t want cornerstones, cut your top sashing the same size as your block + side sashing –  1/2 inch seam allowance (1/4 inch + 1/4 inch = half inch). The formula is:

Block size + vertical sashing – 1/2 inch seam allowance = finished size of top sashing without cornerstones

I can’t tell you the exact size, because I don’t have your blocks in front of me. Use a calculator. I do.

Also, notice that my top and side rows are different. I plan to put a straight strip of fabric across the top and sides as a border, which means I don’t need sashing for the top or sides.

Once you have all of your sashing and cornerstones cut, it is time to sew. I like to start in the bottom left hand corner. I start there because it is closer to my sewing machine when all the blocks are on my design wall. As I sew, the blocks shrink (because of the taken up seam allowance) and get closer to where I am sitting.

Sew vertical sashing to right side of block
Sew vertical sashing to right side of block

First, sew one vertical sashing piece to the right side of your block.

Press to the red.

Sew top sashing to cornerstone
Sew top sashing to cornerstone

Next, sew one piece of the top sashing to a cornerstone. In the above photo the sashing is white and the cornerstone is a red flower fabric.

Take your new little sashing + cornerstone piece to the ironing board and press to the red.

Now, nest the seams and pin the top sashing/cornerstone piece to the block with vertical sashing.

The top sashing should be on the top of the block  as it moves through the sewing machine. Sew the top sashing to the block. 

Top sashing sewn to block with vertical sashing
Top sashing sewn to block with vertical sashing

Sew the side sashing and the top sashing/cornerstone to all the blocks as described above.

IMPORTANT: The top row, as mentioned above, in my quilt, is different, so just sew the vertical sashing to the blocks in the top row and the top sashing to the blocks on the right edge.

All of the blocks have sashing/cornerstones sewn to their correct side
All of the blocks have sashing/cornerstones sewn to their correct side

Once you have sewn all the sashing on to the blocks, you will begin to sew the blocks together. This is chunking. I have talked about it before. I ‘chunk’ because 1) I don’t like sewing long rows together and 2) it keeps my piecing more precise.

Take two blocks with sashing & sew them together
Take two blocks with sashing & sew them together
Pin blocks together, matching seams and sew
Pin blocks together, matching seams and sew

First take the two blocks in the bottom left hand corner, pin them with matched points and nested seams. You will pin them together so that the top white sashing is sewn to the red cornerstone. The white vertical sashing will be sewn to the red block.

Sew them together. I pin in the seam allowance so that i have a better chance at the seams matching up. When I take the pins out as I am sewing, chances increase that the seams won’t match.  In general, to increase my chances of perfectly matching seams, I try to sew towards the seam allowance, but that didn’t work on this quilt, because I pressed towards the red. Use a stiletto to keep the seams in place for as long as possible.

Two blocks with sashing sewn together
Two blocks with sashing sewn together

Now you have a block with sashing on two sides.

 

 

Once you have sewn all of the sashing and cornerstones to the blocks, you will have completed the first step in putting your quilt top together.

Sew sashing to top of blocks on the right edge only
Sew sashing to top of blocks on the right edge only

On the right edge of the quilt, you will only sew the top sashing to the blocks. As mentioned before, there will be a border without cornerstones in my quilt, so I don’t need vertical sashing or cornerstones on the edges. If you want cornerstones in your border, follow the directions above for all blocks.

One long seam left
One long seam left

After you have sewn the various blocks together, you will have one long seam left.

Finished Center with sashing
Finished Center with sashing

Once you sew that seam, the center of your quilt top is done.

I know that the common way of sewing a quilt together is sewing it together in rows then sewing all the rows together. Using the row method is easier to explain than ‘chunking’, but, as I said above, my method is more precise.

 

 

 

**I use affiliate links and may be paid for your purchase of an item when you click on an item link in my post. There is no additional cost to you for clicking or purchasing items I recommend. I appreciate your clicks and purchases as it helps support this blog.