2012 Works in Progress

2012 collage
2012 collage

Good-bye 2012! I really enjoyed you! Nothing really bad happened and one of my dearest dreams (that has nothing to do with quilting) came true.

Here I am again telling you all about my accomplishments. Here are the finishes:

Quilts

Blocks

Journals

Journal Covers

Pillowcases

Merit Badges and Scout Patches

  • 2011 Quality unit patch (April 2012)
  • 2012 Patrol patch
  • Family Life Merit Badge
  • Rifle Merit Badge
  • Shotgun Merit Badge
  • Cinematography Merit Badge
  • Strawboss patch
  • Troop Scribe patch
  • Troop Guide patch

Crafty Projects

I still have a few UFOs waiting for my attention, but due to the 26 Projects List, I made a lot of progress clearing out old projects.

Still WIPs

  1. Aqua-Red SamplerFrances and I finished our fusible machine applique’ blocks and I am supposed to be preparing the next class on curves.
  2. Corner Store:  Finished quilting the entire quilt and am stitching down the binding.
  3. The Tarts Come to Tea: I haven’t quilted on this since April 2011. I really do need to work on the quilting. I was making good progress and then got sidetracked. Quilting the Whole Cloth quilt sort of got me back in the swing of quilting, so perhaps there is hope for this piece?
  4. Garden: I started this piece in a class with Pamela Allen in 2006. I also used this piece for my beading demo for the 2012 EBHQ Voices in Cloth show (March 17). I made the facing and started to stitch it down. After stitching down the facing, I need to make a sleeve and finish about 2? of blanket stitching that I noticed wasn’t complete. I am close to finishing and getting this off the list.
  5. Pointillist Palette #4: Fourth is a series of 6 quilts; needs tiny square patches sewn together. Mrs. K. gave me more PP fabric and I won some from a giveaway. I think it is a sign that I need to work on this.
  6. See: needs satin stitching. Small, also a possibility for finishing.
  7. Self Portrait: started in 2006 at a class at Quilting Adventures in Richmond, Virginia. I like the piece, but don’t know where to go from where I am. Mouth? Hair?
  8. Spiderweb: Top is together, binding is made. I am working at ripping out the foundation paper (what a pain and what a mess!). I need to make a back and then take it to the quilter.
  9. Under the Sea: class project; like the design, but not the colors much.
  10. Flower Sugar Hexagon: sewed more hexagons together. Sewing Y seams is a bit of a chore, so I get tired of doing it after awhile.
  11. Young Man’s t-shirt quilt: have cut up the t-shirts and am still in the process of applying fusible. He cleaned out his drawers and found some more t-shirts to add to the quilt. Oh Yay! <– just a bit of sarcasm. He asked me again for another quilt, so I think this one is next in line. I plugged in his heating mattress pad, though, which should keep him quiet for a bit longer.

I still have a few more WIPs than I do finished projects. I am pleased with the progress I have made.

Ready for Quilting, at the Quilter

  1. Original Bullseye: Top and back are finished. Needs binding and quilting. I think loopy feathers quilted in the border will set off the blocks fine.
  2. FOTY 2011: at the quilter, needs binding.
  3. Stepping Stones: at the quilter, made binding, which she will sew on for me and then I need to stitch down the binding.
  4. New: Wonky 9 Patch: needs quilting and binding. Not on original list
  5. New Super Secret Project #2: Top and back are made. It is ready to go to the quilter. Not on original list
  6. New: Super Secret Project: top, back and binding made. Ready to go to the quilter.  Stay tuned. ;-) Not on original list
  7. Infinity blocks: blocks sewn together into a quilt top, borders on. Back and binding made; ready to go to quilter.
  8. A-B-C (A-Z) BAMQG Challenge – top finished, back and binding finished. Ready for the quilter.

Welcome, 2013! Let’s have an even better year!

Design Series: Negative Space

Negative space is part of Design, but neither an element or principle. It could be included in the lesson on Form or Space, but Sandy and I have chosen to talk about it separately. Be sure to listen to the Episode 114 of Sandy’s podcast, Quilting… for the Rest of Us. where we discuss this topic.

Definitions:

In many basic drawing classes, students learn that there are three basic elements of a composition: the frame, the positive and the negative space. The positive space is easiest to understand. Generally, it is the space occupied by your subject. Conversely, negative space is the space that is not your subject. (Artinspired wiki, Positive & Negative Space page)

  • Positive Space is created by objects that are seen as a main element appearing to be in front of the background.
  • Negative Space “is the space between an object, around an object, but is not part of the actual object itself. It is the opposite of an identifiable object which can at the same time be used to help define the boundaries of positive space.” (http://www.tutorial9.net/articles/design/enhancing-your-art-with-negative-space/)
  • The concept of positive and negative space are also called “figure” and “ground”. (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150)
  • “Negative space, in art, is the space around and between the subject(s) of an image. Negative space may be most evident when the space around a subject, and not the subject itself, forms an interesting or artistically relevant shape, and such space is occasionally used to artistic effect as the “real” subject of an image. ” (http://favbulous.com/post/627/the-art-of-negative-space-illustration)
    • think about the design that appears when you put blocks together and get a secondary design.
  • empty space, space around an object or form; also called white space” (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/negative+space)

If you have 4 identical white rectangles and 4 identical black squares and place the white rectangles horizontally in front of you and put the black squares on the white rectangles in different places on top, you will: (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150)

  • notice very different visual effects “caused solely by its placement within the format” (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150)
  • notice that the location of the black shape immediately organizes the empty (white) space into various shapes (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150)

Notan

“Notan is a Japanese word meaning dark-light. The word, however, means more than that. The principle of Notan as used here must further defined as the interaction between positive (light) and negative (dark) space. The idea of this interaction in Notan is embodied in the ancient Eastern symbol of the Yang and the Yin, which consists of mirror images, one white and one black, revolving around a point of equilibrium. Here the positive and negative areas together make a whole reality. In the Yang and the Yin symbol…opposites complement, they do not conflict. Neither seeks to negate or dominate the other, only to relate in harmony. It is the interaction of the light and the dark, therefore, that is most essential.” (Notan, pg.6)

YinYang from cut-the-knot.org (http://www.cut-the-knot.org/pythagoras/YinYangBisection.shtml)
YinYang from cut-the-knot.org (http://www.cut-the-knot.org/pythagoras/YinYangBisection.shtml)

We, as Westerners, have issues understanding the harmonious relationship of the light and the dark, because of our cultural heritage. “The Western culture thinks in terms of opposed dualities and attaches the moral values of good to the positive, of bad to the negative. Or we seize upon the positive as the only reality and dismiss the negative as invisible and non-existent.” (Notan, pg.6)

  • Remember, again, the secondary design that can pop up unexpectedly when 4 blocks are put together. You don’t want something ugly where your blocks meet. This is kind of the premise of Notan. Thinking of the whole design is the key rather than just the positive space.

Confusion and Trickery

Franz Kline's White Forms (http://www.moma.org/collection_images/resized/436/w155h170crop/CRI_203436.jpg)
Franz Kline’s White Forms (http://www.moma.org/collection_images/resized/436/w155h170crop/CRI_203436.jpg)

Source: google.com via Jaye on Pinterest, piece is Franz Kline’s White Forms

“Sometimes positive and negative shapes are integrated to such an extent that there is truly no visual distinction.”In Franz Kline’s White Forms, “we automatically see some black shapes on a background. But when we read the artist’s titles, White Forms, suddenly the view changes, and we begin to focus on the white shapes, with the black areas now perceived as negative space. The artist has purposely made the positive/negative relationship ambiguous. (Pentak & Lauer, pg.154).

https://www.pablopicasso.org/portrait-of-daniel-henry-kahnweiler.jsp
https://www.pablopicasso.org/portrait-of-daniel-henry-kahnweiler.jsp

Source: https://www.pablopicasso.org/portrait-of-daniel-henry-kahnweiler.jsp, piece is Pablo Picasso’s Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler

“In most paintings of the past, the separation of object and background was easily seen, even if the selected areas merged visually. But several twentieth-century styles literally do away with the distinction. We can see that the subject matter of the painting,” Pablo Picasso’s Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler, “is a figure. Despite the cubist abstractions of natural forms into geometric planes, we can discern the theme. But it is difficult to determine just which areas are part of the figure and which are background. The artist, Picasso, also broke up the space in the same cubist manner. There is no clear delineation of the positive from the negative.” (Pentak & Lauer, pg.154-155).  In Georges Seurat’s Silhouette of a Woman, the Black Bow and The Artist’s Mother (Woman Sewing), (late 1800s, not 20th century, not a Cubist) the positive and negative spaces meld so much as to confuse the mind as to which is which.

Some artists play with the reversal of positive and negative space to create complex illusions. The prints of M. C. Escher … often feature interlocking images that play with our perception of what is foreground and what is background. Other artists take these illusions of positive and negative images to even greater lengths, hiding images within images. Perception of form and shape are conditioned by our ingrained “instinct” to impute meaning and order to visual data. When we look at an image and initially form an impression, there is a tendency to latch on to that conclusion about its meaning, and then ignore other possible solutions. This may make it hard to see the other images. Training the eye to keep on looking beyond first impressions is a crucial step in developing true visual literacy.” (Art Design & Visual Thinking http://char.txa.cornell.edu/language/element/form/form.htm)

Inverted Star Tutorial - purchase on Craftsy
Inverted Star Tutorial – purchase on Craftsy

Above star is a great use of negative space. Flipping the negative space to positive. See below for homework on this block.

Notes:

  • In a picture, the shapes that the artist has deliberately placed are considered the positive shapes. The spaces around the shapes are the negative spaces. It is just as important to consider the negative space in a picture as the positive shapes. Sometimes artists create pieces that have no distinction between positive and negative spaces. M. C. Escher was a master at creating drawings where there was no distinction between positive and negative space. (Skaalid, http://www.usask.ca/education/coursework/skaalid/theory/cgdt/shape.htm)
  • For every positive shape, there is a negative shape surrounding it. (Artinspired wiki, Positive & Negative Space page http://artinspired.pbworks.com/w/page/13819678/Positive%20and%20Negative%20Space)
  • A good artist realizes that the space surrounding an object (positive space / shape / mass / etc) is just as important as that object itself. Negative space helps define a subject, and brings balance to a composition.
  • The placement of one shape – a positive figure or foreground – creates another, a negative figure or background. The placement of a shape organizes the empty space around it into more shapes. (The Quilter’s Book of Design, 2d, pg.62) 
  • “Negative space, or whitespace, is a powerful design element which impacts both the aesthetics and usability …; too little and the design feels cramped, too much and related page elements can become disconnected.” (Wayne Moir website: http://www.waynemoir.com/notebook/asides/negative-space-in-design/)
  • “It is important to remember that both elements have been thoughtfully designed and planned by the artist. The subject is the focal point, but the negative areas created are equally important in the final pictorial effect.” (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150)
  • With three dimensional art [forms], such as a sculpture, one can see how the object occupies space by walking around it, looking from above, below or from the side. Three dimensional objects have height, width and depth. With two dimensional art [like a quilt], the arrangement of objects on the design field can be crowded with lots of objects or nearly empty with very few objects. These design elements have height and width, but no depth. (A Fiber Artist’s Guide to Color and Design, pg.130)
  • “Negative shapes are also an aspect of letter design and typography.” (Pentak & Lauer, pg.150) People design fonts so they look good on the page – the right amount of space between letters and lines, etc.
  • The artist usually wants some back-and-forth visual movement between the positive shapes and the negative” space. “An unrelieved silhouette of every shape is usually not the most interesting spatial solution.” Generally, depending on the message you, as the artist, wants to convey, breaking the “background” into “areas of value that lend interest as well as better positive/negative integration” will make for a better design. (Pentak & Lauer, pg.152)
Swoon Secondary Design
Swoon Secondary Design

I have highlighted the part of my design that is the unintended secondary design. It is less prominent, because of the variety of backgrounds, but still marked enough to pay attention and make some definite decisions about.

Examples:

Homework:

  • Photocopy or print famous paintings in black and white. Look at the negative and positive spaces and notice their shapes.  The following are specifically mentioned in Pentak & Lauer: Georges Seurat’s Silhouette of a Woman, the Black Bow and The Artist’s Mother (Woman Sewing), but you can use any. Try to find one or two with simple lines.
  • Cut 4 2×2″ black squares, cut out 4 2.5″x4.5″ white rectangles. Arrange the black squares on the white rectangles in different ways and notice the way the negative space is organized. (See above)
  • See how the negative space is affected with different iterations of this block. Make the block above with:
    • one solid fabric where the scrappy fabrics are located
    • different solid fabrics in the same color range, e.g. all blues. Tone-on-tones would work, too.
    • change where the colors are with where the background is
    • the same type of fabric layout, then quilt the center with a complex pattern that has its own design, such as a feathered wreath, in white thread to see whether the center Sawtooth Star is still negative space
    • the same type of fabric layout, then quilt the center with a complex pattern that has its own design, such as a feathered wreath, in colored thread to see whether the center Sawtooth Star is still negative space

Resources:

Art Design & Visual Thinking http://char.txa.cornell.edu/language/element/form/form.htm

Artinspired wiki, Positive & Negative Space page http://artinspired.pbworks.com/w/page/13819678/Positive%20and%20Negative%20Space

Artline Elements of Design: http://coolschool.k12.or.us/courses/115100/welcome/elements1.html

Favbulous: http://favbulous.com

A Fiber Artist’s Guide to Color and Design by Heather Thomas

Design Basics, 5th, c.1999, David A. Lauer, Stephen Pentak (has an excellent section on positive and negative space)

The Quilter’s Book of Design, 2d

Notan: the dark-light principle of design by Dorr Bothwell and Marlys Mayfield, 1968

Wayne Moir website: http://www.waynemoir.com/notebook/asides/negative-space-in-design/

Tutorial9: Enhancing your art with negative space: http://www.tutorial9.net/articles/design/enhancing-your-art-with-negative-space/

Bonnie Skaalid, Web Design for Instruction: Classic Graphic Design Theory: Elements of Design: Shape http://www.usask.ca/education/coursework/skaalid/theory/cgdt/shape.htm

Gift Pillowcases

As you may have seen in another post, I have been on a bit of a pillowcase making binge. It is hard not to binge as they are similar to potato chips. In the process of making donation pillowcases, I also made a couple of gifts.

K-man's Pillowcase
K-man’s Pillowcase

The gift pillowcase for my 14 year old nephew was languishing. It started it a long time ago and never finished it. I don’t know why it was sitting around, but it was. I had seen it a week or so ago, so in the midst of the pillowcase making frenzy, I pulled it out to assess what needed to be done.

What needed to be done was pretty easy to fix. I hadn’t caught part of the seam in the stitch line, so I trimmed the bottom even and stitched it again, then made the French seam on the inside and it was done. Too bad I didn’t finish it for Christmas.

Sweet Dreams Pillowcase #3
Sweet Dreams Pillowcase #3

I also found more of the chocolate fabric I liked so much when I made the Chocolate/Sweet dreams pillowcase #2 earlier this year. I believe I bought the fabric in Pennsylvania or Maryland last year. I have to say, I could make pillowcases with this chocolate fabric until the cows come home and never get tired of it. This will go to my niece when she is back at college so she has sweet dreams.

You might also enjoy reading:

  1. Chocolate Pillowcase
  2. Sweet Dreams Pillowcase

 

Pillowcases for Sandy Hook Kids

10 Pillowcases
10 Pillowcases

As mentioned in a recent post, there is a project to collect pillowcases for the kids at Sandy Hook Elementary in CT. Making pillowcases was on my radar, but I had to get through Christmas first, with lots of baking and cooking, family and friends. I wasn’t putting those in need behind my real life. I really wanted time to work with the pattern and make sure the pillowcases were well made and of good quality. The way Twiddletails shows the cutting doesn’t mesh with my thought processes, so I have to really think about it and focus if I don’t want to waste fabric.

I like that pattern, though, because once you get past the first stitch line, you have only two more stitching lines to complete the pillowcase. I also like it because there are no raw edges due to the French seams.

The Mexican food fabric (with beige and green backgrounds) had been languishing for quite awhile and it was time to use them. As you might remember, my intent was to make teenage boy/older boy friendly pillowcases. I know the kids at Sandy Hook are on the younger side, but perhaps there are 5th or 6th graders who are past cheerful trucks and dancing animals who will like them. I find it so easy to find fabric suitable for toddlers, but not so much suitable for teenaged boys.

Dream Fabric
Dream Fabric

You might have noticed that some of the pillowcases have a green in them that is slightly off. I found this fabric in my green bin when I was looking for something to go with the Mexican food fabric. It yelled out “I am dream fabric and perfect for pillowcases” to me when I saw it. Sadly, I used most of it for something and barely had enough for half a pillowcase much less a whole. I decided to use it for the trim. Yes, the color is a bit off, but I want these pillowcases to induce sweet dreams and be infused with good energy, so I put a little bit in. The viewer can’t see the clouds in the finished pieces, but I know they are there. I really wish I had enough for whole pillowcases.

Circus Pillowcase
Circus Pillowcase

I pulled out a bin I had noticed when I was rearranging and cleaning up after a fabri-lanche recently. It had multi-color fabrics in it. I didn’t remember buying most of the fabrics and they are not fabrics I would buy now, but were very cheerful and GREAT for kids.

I was especially pleased to find this circus print, and enough of it to make a pillowcase and a cuff, as it demands to be left in large pieces rather than cut up. Notice that the cuff is a companion print. At one time I also had the star companion print, but couldn’t find it. I must have used it.

I sent the pillowcases off yesterday and the postage was $12.00+ for parcel post! I forgot how heavy fabric is. That is done and today I am on to something else. Stay tuned!

You might als0 be interested in the following posts:

  1. Doing Good for Sandy Hook
  2. Twiddletails pattern
  3. Thanks, But No Thanks

Creative Prompt #188: Aid

help

International aid

government aid

Definition #1: to provide with what is useful or necessary in achieving an end.

financial aid

assist

Association for Individual Development

KitchenAid mixer

Rite Aid

California Student Aid Commission

World Teacher Aid

aid worker

Aid for Trade

Truth AID

World Bank Aid Effectiveness: Aid effectiveness is the impact that aid has in reducing poverty and inequality, increasing growth, building capacity, and accelerating achievement of the Millennium Development Goals set by the international community. Indicators here cover aid received as well as progress in reducing poverty and improving education, health, and other measures of human welfare.

Take 5 minutes to do any kind of artistic response: poem, doodle, quilt, pastel, pencil. ANYTHING counts. No rules; just do it!

Post the direct URL (link) where your drawing, doodle, artwork is posted (e.g. your blog, Flickr) in the comments area of this post. I would really like to keep all the artwork together and provide a way for others to see your work and/or your blog.

The Creative Prompt Project, also, has a Flickr group, which you can join to  post your responses. I created this spot so those of you without blogs and websites would have a place to post your responses.

 

Definition #2: In international relations, aid (also known as international aid, overseas aid, or foreign aid) is – from the perspective of governments – a voluntary transfer of resources from one country to another, given at least partly with the objective of benefiting the recipient country.[1]

It may have other functions as well: it may be given as a signal of diplomatic approval, or to strengthen a military ally, to reward a government for behaviour desired by the donor, to extend the donor’s cultural influence, to provide infrastructure needed by the donor for resource extraction from the recipient country, or to gain other kinds of commercial access.[2] Humanitarianism and altruism are, nevertheless, significant motivations for the giving of aid.[3]

Aid may be given by gangs, private organizations, or governments. Standards delimiting exactly the kinds of transfers that count as aid vary. For example, aid figures may or may not include transfers for military use: to cite one instance, the United States included military assistance in its aid figure until 1957 but no longer does.<Fund (DLF) to provide concessional credits to developing countries world-wide (i.e. not, as in the past, just those in areas of potential conflict with Moscow) to promote their long-term growth.</ref> ref>Lancaster, p 67: “In 1957 the administration (with congressional support) separated economic from military assistance and created a Development Loan

The most widely measure of aid, “Official Development Assistance” (ODA) is such a figure. It is compiled by the Development Assistance Committee of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. The United Nations, the World Bank, and many scholars use the DAC’s ODA figure as their main aid figure because it is easily available and reasonably consistently calculated over time and between countries.[5] The DAC consists of 22 of the wealthiest Western industrialised countries plus the EU; it is a forum in which they coordinate their aid policies.

Quilting the Corner Store

Border & Center Quilted
Border & Center Quilted

I spent several hours last week quilting the Corner Store.

Yes, she who does not normally quilt large pieces quilted a large quilt.

I went easy on myself, because my shoulder is acting up again and I didn’t want to be crippled when I had so much to do for the holiday. My pile of quilts to be quilted is getting ridiculous (7 that I can remember), though, and I wanted something to give to my BIL to provide some comfort while he goes through radiation treatment.

Quilting the 1st Border
Quilting the 1st Border

I used to be a good quilter (not like Colleen, but I could hold my own). I stopped quilting large pieces when I hurt my neck and am way out of practice. I wanted to go easy on myself and I didn’t want to try anything too ambitious, so I stuck with straight lines and gentle curves. I have to admit that my original idea for the first border (white) was to fill it with a line of large circles. I couldn’t fix the tension enough to make it look good, so I went with the straight lines. It kind of looks like a frame, if you squint.

Corner Quilting
Corner Quilting

In the last photo (left), you can see some of the quilting in the center. I used a Valdani variegated thread that I bought in Chicago several years ago. I don’t really like variegated thread, but it works in certain circumstances.

You can also see how I used the walking foot to measure the space between the quilting lines. I kind of like doing that as it seems to be a consistent measurement.

The quilt won’t win any prizes, but if it provides some comfort, I will be happy.

You also might be interested in reading:

  1. Corner Store Again
  2. Corner Store Once More

Paris Back for Jelly Roll Race #2

Paris Back
Paris Back

I wrote about my second Jelly Roll Race quilt a few days ago. I don’t remember if I hadn’t made the back yet, or, for some other reason, I just didn’t post about it. Probably the former, but that seems like an eternity ago, so I really can’t say.

I had a number of pieces of Paris related fabric that I bought specifically for the back of this quilt. Lil Sissy loves Paris, so it seemed appropriate.

I am actually kind of eager to quilt this. I need a basting fairy.

FOTY 2012

FOTY 2012 Late December
FOTY 2012 Late December

While I am making progress on preparing to sew the FOTY 2012, I still have a pile of fabric to press, not to mention the other pile I have to wash AND press. There is no way for me to get it all done, but I will get as much done as possible before I start sewing at the CQFA Retreat in January.

I do enjoy this process, however. I like seeing these photos and thinking about what I made from the fabrics.

I have FOTY 201o hanging in my hallway and I keep walking by thinking “I need to find that fabric; it would be perfect with X project.” That is really fun.

 

Swoon #13

Swoon #13
Swoon #13

I have never counted this as a project, but I think I have to admit that it is. I now have 13 blocks, this one being the latest. I also have #14 on the Design wall.

I decided that I would make the last few blocks and sew this piece together. I have had my fun and would like to finish this piece.

I don’t hate the process, so it won’t be a chore or anything. I just want to move on, especially with the Star Sampler looming.

I guess I also have to admit that, while I am pleased with the progress I have made on clearing out old projects, I want to clear out more lurking projects. I don’t want anymore 10 year+  projects hanging around.

You can take a look at Swoon blocks 11 & 12.

MQG Pincushion Swap Update

125 pincushions
125 pincushions

You might remember that I made a pincushion for a Modern Quilt Guild swap (and sent me into an orgy of pincushion making), which was organized by the Kansas Modern Quilt Guild. You can see the pincushions that were sent in to swap on Flickr. Not all of them are up there yet, so go back and look later.

The photo, left, was posted to the BAMQG Ning site (members only) by Adrianne. I tried to find the original source, but couldn’t, so I may swap it out, if I find it later. My pincushion is in the upper left hand corner a tiny bit in from the exact left.

I love the creativity, but I have to say that I am pretty pleased with the way my pincushion turned out. It looks like a pincushion and is cute, but not cutesy, if you know what I mean.

I haven’t received a pincushion yet, but others in the guild have so I am waiting with bated breath.

Creative Prompt #187: Princess

Take 5 minutes to do any kind of artistic response: poem, doodle, quilt, pastel, pencil. ANYTHING counts. No rules; just do it!

Post the direct URL (link) where your drawing, doodle, artwork is posted (e.g. your blog, Flickr) in the comments area of this post. I would really like to keep all the artwork together and provide a way for others to see your work and/or your blog.

The Creative Prompt Project, also, has a Flickr group, which you can join to  post your responses. I created this spot so those of you without blogs and websites would have a place to post your responses.

Princess Diana

Pretty, pretty princess

Disney princess

Definition: Princess is the feminine form of prince (from Latin princeps, meaning principal citizen). Most often, the term has been used for the consort of a prince or for the daughters of a king or sovereign prince.

For many centuries, the title “princess” was not regularly used for a monarch’s daughter, who might simply be called “Lady” or a non-English equivalent. Old English had no female equivalent of “prince”, “earl”, or any royal or noble title aside from queen. Royal women, or women of the nobility, were simply addressed or referred to as “Lady” or “The Lady Firstname” for a particularly highborn woman.

As women slowly gained more autonomy and respect in European history, the title of princess became simply the female counterpart of prince; it does not necessarily imply being merely married to a prince.[citation needed] A princess may be a hereditary, sovereign, head of state in her own right.

The traditional meaning still applies in Europe in the sense that an untitled or at least non-royal woman who marries a prince will almost always become a princess with the possibility of eventually becoming Queen Consort, in nations where that title exists; but a man who marries a princess will almost never become a prince, unless his wife is expected to inherit the higher title of Queen regnant. If that is the case, then on her inheritance of that sovereign title, he will often become a prince (or remain one if he was already a prince).

In many of Europe’s royal families, a king would grant his heirs actual or theoretical principalities to train them for future kingship or to give them social class. This practice has led over time to many people thinking that “prince” and “princess” are titles reserved for the immediate family of a king or queen. In fact, most princesses in history were not immediate members of a royal family but rather women who married into it.

Princess Cruises

Princes (2006 movie)

Princess Kate

Princess Project

The Princess and the Pea

Princess Animal – SF Rock & Roll Craft Bar

 

26 Projects List – December Update

Yes, I rearranged the way this post was structured. You will get to see the year’s roundup soon, but I wanted to highlight the finishes on this list, too.

Finished projects that were on the list:

  1. Stars for San Bruno #2: Finished! YAY!
  2. Pavers. Finished! YAY!
  3. Kissy Fish: Finished! Yay!
  4. Stars for San Bruno #3: Finished! YAY!
  5. Food Quilt: Finished 5/24/2012. YAY!!!!
  6. Renewed Jelly Roll Race Quilt: Finished 9/9/2012 YAY!!!
  7. Whole Cloth Quilt: Finished 10/5/2012 YAY!!!
  8. Flowering Snowball: Finished 10/31/2012 YAY!!!

I came across last year’s end of year post and realized that I surpassed my previous goal of 9 quilts finished in one year last year when I finished 10 quilts. If I want to surpass another significant goal, I will have to finish at least 11 quilts this year. There is no hope for me now. Oh well, I did make a lot of progress on projects and that pleases me. I also had fun, which is the goal, right?

Still WIPs

  1. Aqua-Red SamplerFrances and I finished our fusible machine applique’ blocks and I am supposed to be preparing the next class on curves.
  2. The Tarts Come to Tea: I haven’t quilted on this since April 2011. I really do need to work on the quilting. I was making good progress and then got sidetracked. Quilting the Whole Cloth quilt sort of got me back in the swing of quilting, so perhaps there is hope for this piece.
  3. Garden: I started this piece in a class with Pamela Allen in 2006. I also used this piece for my beading demo for the 2012 EBHQ Voices in Cloth show (March 17). I made the facing and started to stitch it down. After stitching down the facing, I need to make a sleeve and finish about 2″ of blanket stitching that I noticed wasn’t complete.
  4. Pointillist Palette #4: Fourth is a series of 6 quilts; needs tiny square patches sewn together. Mrs. K. gave me more PP fabric and I won some from a giveaway. I think it is a sign that I need to work on this.
  5. See: needs satin stitching. Small, also a possibility for finishing.
  6. Self Portrait: started in 2006 at a class at Quilting Adventures in Richmond, Virginia. I like the piece, but don’t know where to go from where I am. Mouth? Hair?
  7. Spiderweb: Top is together, binding is made. I am working at ripping out the foundation paper (what a pain and what a mess!). I need to make a back and then take it to the quilter.
  8. Under the Sea: class project; like the design, but not the colors much.
  9. Flower Sugar Hexagon: sewed more hexagons together. Sewing Y seams is a bit of a chore, so I get tired of doing it after awhile.
  10. Young Man’s t-shirt quilt: have cut up the t-shirts and am still in the process of applying fusible. He cleaned out his drawers and found some more t-shirts to add to the quilt. Oh Yay! <– just a bit of sarcasm. He asked me again for another quilt, so I think this one is next in line. I plugged in his heating mattress pad, though, which should keep him quiet for a bit longer.

I still have a few more WIPs than I do finished projects. Again, I have made progress on clearing out old projects and I am pleased.

Ready for Quilting by Checkbook

  1. Original Bullseye: Top and back are finished. Needs binding and quilting. I think loopy feathers quilted in the border will set off the blocks fine.
  2. FOTY 2011: at the quilter, needs binding.
  3. Stepping Stones: at the quilter, made binding, which she will sew on for me and then I need to stitch down the binding.
  4. New: Wonky 9 Patch: needs quilting and binding. Not on original list
  5. Corner Store:  Finished quilting the middle and am preparing to work on the borders.
  6. New Super Secret Project #2: Top and back are made. It is ready to go to the quilter. Not on original list
  7. New: Super Secret Project: top, back and binding made. Ready to go to the quilter.  Stay tuned. 😉 Not on original list
  8. Infinity blocks: blocks sewn together into a quilt top, borders on. Back and binding made; ready to go to quilter.
  9. A-B-C (A-Z) BAMQG Challenge – top finished, back and binding finished. Ready for the quilter.

Abandoned

  1. Flower Garden: The flowers were too spiky. This is going to Pam for a cat bed.
  2. Pineapple: will remake blocks at a later time with more care.
  3. Moon and Stars: This quilt was barely a quilt and was not interesting. I realized I didn’t want to devote time to it. So, I finally just decided to give up and get it off the list. I will send it to Pam for a cat mat.

Hunting and Gathering

  1. Spin Wheel: really not started, but supplies gathered. Cutting fabrics as I go. TFQ does not consider this a UFO and made some good points to that end, which is why I have moved it to the Hunting and Gathering section. She says, and I have to agree, that quilts are not ‘projects’ until the sewing starts. OK. I’ll go with that.
  2. Windmill quilt: Still hunting and gathering.
  3. Stepping Stones #2 using Bonnie & Camille fabrics Bliss, Ruby, Vintage Modern: made two blocks, but still on back burner while I decide on the background colors.

I am pretty pleased. I have 8 projects off the list and 9 others with a definite plan.

I am still mulling over whether I want to continue this update into 2013. I, of course, want to create some kind of disposition for all of the quilts and projects on the list. However, I do want to think of a new focus for 2013 and I don’t want it to be the same focus year after year. Stay tuned while I decide.

Patchwork Wheels Possible Layout

Patchwork Wheel Comparison
Patchwork Wheel Comparison

I am  redoubling my efforts to do good with fabric. To that end, I am thinking that I would like to finish the Patchwork Wheel blocks before Christmas and, thus, I need to think about layouts.

I mulled publicly sashing this piece in the last post and was pleased to receive an email from SherriD with her Photoshop handiwork allowing me to see the effects visually.

I like the space between the blocks that the sashing provides and I have plenty of Kona Snow to make sashing. I am not quite sure if Kona Snow will match the background used in the blocks, though, and that might be an issue.

The sashing-less version is much more chaotic, but it does look like roads winding through a town.

Thanks, again, to SherriD for taking the time to create this image for me.

Jelly Roll Race #2

Calm Top
Calm Top

I lost my mind again. I made another Jelly Roll Race despite the drama of the Renewed Jelly Roll Race.

“What were you thinking?????” is what I hear being screamed at me and you have every right to scream. No rending of garments or tearing of hair, please.

In certain respects, quiltmaking is an intellectual challenge for me. I want to know what makes the techniques tick, why fabric behaves the way it does and, often, what happens if….. The intellectual challenge in this case is to figure out how to make a Jelly Roll Race quilt not look terrible, to have some sort of control over what seems, essentially, to be an uncontrollable technique in terms of design.

In the back of my mind the little quilt voice was telling me to try the Jelly Roll Race technique again. It is hard to face that reality, but I have to. I don’t like failing at something unless I understand why and this is a mystifying technique.

Bali Pop Strip Set
Bali Pop Strip Set

I bought one of the Hoffman Bali Pops at PIQF (or shortly after, perhaps). I think that the first thing that makes a Jelly Roll Race more successful is to buy one with batiks. Batiks blend together really nicely and they have a depth that is subtle. I really liked the calming colors of this particular combination. I am not much of a beige person, but I was ok with the beiges in this collection, because they tended towards yellow or gold and went with the other the fabrics very well. I would buy this collection again. In fact, working with these colors and fabrics made me ask myself why I don’t buy more batiks. I don’t know if I could find the stock numbers of this particular collection and buy them all, though I suppose it is possible. I need to just buy more batiks.

TFQ was here and she arranged all the strips for me. It was very helpful, because I didn’t think to do it before hand, but really needed to do so.

Sewing LOOOOONG Seams
Sewing LOOOOONG Seams

Why I say I lost my mind is that this type of quilt is a pain in the neck. I forgot how much thread this technique uses and how long the seams are. I went through at least 2 bobbins of Aurifil! Ironing the piece was stultifying! This technique is just plain tedious.

We did cut half of the strips in half, which made the process more tedious. I can’t say whether it made the top more interesting or not. I need more data to decide on that point.

I do think I had some success with this quilt top, though, so some tips:

  1. Use batiks or blendy fabrics.
  2. Arrange all the strips in the order you want to sew them. I suggest placing the same fabrics next to each other, so they don’t end up on top of each other.
  3. Add 2.5″x2.5″ square to the end of each strip. It adds interest to the quilt and helps move the eye around the design field.
  4. When you fold the first long strip in half to sew the halves together to start stacking the strips, don’t be afraid to adjust the strips so that the 2.5″ squares don’t butt up against each other right off the bat.
  5. Keep all the strips on the machine in one long chain until all the strips are sewn together. The way I did it was to sew the 2.5″ square to the strip, do the same for the next one. Continue. As soon as convenient, sew strip 1 to strip 2.
  6. Iron seams open, but fingerpress first. This method creates less bulk

Optional: cut the long strip into lengths of about 63″ and arrange them the way you want and then sew them together. TFQ’s idea was to sew a few strips together see how it was going and then rearrange them before sewing them all together. Good advice I didn’t take.

I may try this again despite the tedium of the long seams, because I made my husband do some math (will see about making it pretty and posting it sometime) to try and figure out how to keep like fabrics from butting up against each other as the rows are sewn together.

Last post on Jelly Roll Race quilts.